Sanibel In March and April- CROW Speaker Series

Credit: The Clinic for the Rehabilitation of Wildlife; www. crowclinic.org

If you’re an island regular or visiting for the first time I’m sure you’ve seen logos and stickers everywhere for something called “CROW”.  But what does this acronym stand for?  CROW, short for The Clinic for the Rehabilitation of Wildlife is a most important part of Sanibel Island and represent one of the best aspects of who we are as a community. The Clinic for the Rehabilitation of Wildlife is a teaching hospital and visitor education center dedicated to saving wildlife through state-of-the-art veterinary care, research, education and conservation medicine. The doctors and volunteers at CROW save wildlife through state-of-the-art veterinary care, research, education and conservation medicine. The non-profit organization is funded by individuals, visitors, businesses and foundations.  

Every year, CROW hosts an event called the “CROW Speaker Series.”  Join locals and visitors for a series of lectures presented by environmental professionals from Southwest Florida with topics ranging from wildlife photography to conservation medicine. All lectures are approximately one hour and begin promptly at 4:15 p.m. in CROW’s Visitor Education Center located at 3883 Sanibel Captiva Rd. Click here for directions from Gulf Breeze Cottages to CROW.

Advance registration is required to attend the CROW speaker series lectures. Admission costs $10 for adults; $5 for children aged 3-17; free to children under 12.

Rachel Rainbolt, Education Coordinator 239-472-3644 ext. 228 rrainbolt@crowclinic.org Advanced registration required

 

Upcoming lectures:

March 20: Soaring into the Future of Conservation Medicine

Presented by Heather Barron, DVM, Dipl. ABVP-avian, Hospital Director for Clinic for the Rehabilitation of Wildlife (CROW)

CROW has a growing responsibility and commitment to the one world, one health concept which emphasizes a cooperative approach to the interrelated health of animals, people, and the ecosystem. Conservation medicine addresses these growing disease challenges through interdisciplinary collaboration and CROW plays an integral part. Come talk with Dr. Barron about what CROW has done for wildlife health lately and what this could mean for the health of you, your children, your pets,  your food supply, and the earth.

March 28: Story of Ospreys

Presented by Claudia Burns, Volunteer for International Osprey Foundation

Ospreys are large brown and white raptors who breed in southwest Florida from December through April and can be seen diving for live fish in shallow waters throughout the area. Because they build their nests right out in the open, their behavior is easy to observe, but not always easy to understand. This presentation uses photos, videos and recorded vocalizations to explain osprey behavior.

April 3: The Feather Wars

Presented by Jim Powers, Research Historian for Southwest Florida Museum of History

A 50-year War was fought in South Florida 1870-1920 with unfathomable casualties. The world beyond South Florida was slow to recognize the one-sided belligerency fought in the swamps and wetlands of the expansive Florida Everglades. Cracker settlers grabbed their shotguns and professional hunters and wealthy tourists eagerly joined exporters to form an army of profiteers. Initially, the opposition army was avian alone and could only scatter or fly away because their plumage was considered fashionable and was of greater monetary value than an equal weight of gold.

April 11: Story of Ospreys

Presented by Claudia Burns, Volunteer for International Osprey Foundation

Ospreys are large brown and white raptors who breed in southwest Florida from December through April and can be seen diving for live fish in shallow waters throughout the area. Because they build their nests right out in the open, their behavior is easy to observe, but not always easy to understand. This presentation uses photos, videos and recorded vocalizations to explain osprey behavior.

April 17: Snakes of Sanibel & Captiva

Presented by Chris Lechowicz, Director of Habitat Management and Herpetologist for Sanibel Captiva Conservation Foundation

Sanibel and Captiva islands are home to over a dozen native snakes (plus one exotic). Many rumors and hearsay about snakes can cause fear in people (sometimes resulting in unwarranted killing of snakes) and cloud the importance of the snake’s role in the ecosystem. This lecture will focus on identifying all of the snakes known from the islands, as well as correcting some common misconceptions about snakes. Chris will bring a few live examples of Florida snakes.